Thursday, 28 Oct 2021
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How To Use The Nikon D7000 (Step-By-Step Guide)

Welcome to this detailed guide on how to use the Nikon D7000. If you are new to this camera and don’t know your way around the menus and controls, this is for you.

We’ll be showing you everything you need to know in order to take great photos with this camera. So without wasting any more time, let’s begin.

 

How To Use The Nikon D7000 — Specs

The Nikon D7000 is an Advanced-Level DSLR. It was announced on the 15th September, 2015.

The D7000 has a 16-megapixel APS-C CMOS sensor. This will give you a lot of detail in your photos. It also has an optical viewfinder and Face Detection focus for better framing, and more control.

It also has a burst rate of 6fps, a battery life of 1050 shots, and weather sealing. This makes it easier to shoot in harsh weather conditions with this camera.

The Nikon D7000 also has a few downsides. For instance, it weighs quite a lot. This makes it hard to carry about for long lengths of time. It also has no wireless connectivity, no image stabilization, and no touchscreen.

 

 

How To Use The Nikon D7000: Setting Up The Camera

Note: you can skip this part if you are already familiar with the basics.

First of all, you must put the battery into the camera. You can do this by opening the compartment at the bottom of the camera and putting the battery in.

You also need to attach the lens to the camera. Look for a white dot on the camera, and look for another white dot on the lens. Simply line the two dots up, and turn until you hear a click.

Finally, you need to put a memory card in the camera. If you are just starting out, don’t bother buying an expensive SD card. A simple inexpensive one will be enough. All you need to do is open up the SD card slot, and insert the card.

Once you’ve followed all these steps, you can power up the camera by turning the On/Off switch.

 

 

How To Use The Nikon D7000 — Buttons and Dials

 

Plus/minus button

This button is used for exposure compensation. Pressing the button by itself won’t do anything unless you turn either the front or the back dials at the same time. The front dial controls your aperture, while the back dial controls the shutter speed.

Function button

This is a customizable button which you can use as a shortcut for accessing any feature.

PLAY button

You can use this button to view your images.

Shutter button

This button is for automatically focusing, and taking pictures. When you want to take a picture, press the button half way down.

This makes the camera focus automatically on your subject. After this, you can take the picture by pressing the button down completely.

Live view trigger

This button has Lv written on it. This takes you to Live View mode. In this mode, your camera switches from the viewfinder to the LCD screen. This is useful for monitoring video feed while recording.

Record button

This button is for recording videos. Simply press the button to start recording, and press it again to stop.

D-pad

You can use this to navigate through options in the menu and also scroll through pictures.

Mode dial

With this dial, you can change your shooting mode. There are various shooting modes such as, AUTO mode, Manual mode, Program mode, Aperture priority mode, and Shutter priority mode.

Let’s take a look at AUTO mode first. In this mode, the camera handles all the settings for you. This is the most ideal option beginners.

Next, we have Manual mode. This mode gives you full control over the shutter speed and aperture. The camera will notify you if the exposure is off, but won’t stop you.

Now let’s talk about Program mode. In this mode the camera sets the aperture and shutter speed, but still gives you the ability to tweak a few settings.

In Aperture priority mode, you can control the aperture by yourself using the command dial, while the camera sets the shutter speed.

Finally, in Shutter priority mode, you set the shutter speed by yourself, while the camera handles other settings.

 

 

How To Use The Nikon D7000 — Menus

Note: you won’t have access to all the camera’s menu features unless you’re in manual mode.

To enter the main menu, press the Menu button. In here, you will notice other sub-menus such as…

PLAYBACK menu

In this menu, you can review photos, play them in a slide show, rotate them, or delete them.

SHOOTING menu

You can choose the quality and sizes of your photos, control ISO sensitivity, set white balance, and set picture style.

You can also control noise reduction, auto distortion, flash, metering, focus mode, AF-area mode, and movie settings.

SETUP menu

In this menu, you can control and customize basic things like the date/time, language, screen brightness, and format memory card. You can also control flicker reduction, HDMI, file naming, and Airplane mode.

RETOUCH menu

In this menu, you can edit your all your photos. However, it it advised that you use a computer for all your editing and post-processing.

 

 

How To Use The Nikon D7000 — Frequently Asked  Questions

How do I record videos on my Nikon camera?

To record videos on a Nikon camera, press the Lv button to switch to Live View mode. This mode camera turns on the LCD screen, giving you the ability to monitor the video feed coming into the camera. To start recording, press the button with a red dot in the middle. Once you are through, press the button again to stop.

 

Is the Nikon D7000 a professional camera?

The Nikon D7000 is an advanced-level DSLR. It has a high sensor resolution which gives you a lot of detail in your photos. It also has a high maximum ISO, which brings out more detail in low-light situations.

Thanks to its many features and capabilities, the Nikon D7000 is a great camera for professional photographers.

 

What lenses are compatible with the Nikon D7000?

Here are the Nikon D7000’s compatible lenses…

Normal lenses

Nikon AF 50mm f/1,8 D
Nikon AF-S 24-85mm f/3,5-4,5 G ED VR
Sigma EX 50mm f/1,4 DG HSM
Sigma EX 50mm f/2,8 DG Macro
Sigma EX 70mm f/2,8 DG Macro
Nikon AF-S DX 16-85mm f/3,5-5,6 G ED VR
Sigma 17-70mm f/2,8-4,5 DC HSM Macro
Sigma 18-125mm f/3,8-5,6 DC OS HSM
Sigma 18-50mm f/2,8-4,5 DC OS HSM
Nikon AF-S DX 18-105mm f/3,5-5,6 G ED VR
Nikon AF-S DX 18-55mm f/3,5-5,6 G ED VR
Nikon AF-S 50mm f/1,4 G f/1,4
Nikon AF-S 50mm f/1,8 G f/1,8
Nikon AF-S 50mm f/1,8 G SE
Tamron SP AF 17-50mm f/2,8 XR Di-II LD IF VC
Tamron SP AF 28-75mm f/2,8 XR Di
Tamron SP AF 28-75mm f/2,8 XR Di Macro
Nikon AF-S 60mm f/2,8 G ED Micro
Sigma EX 24-70mm f/2,8 DG Macro
Sigma EX 30mm f/1,4 DC HSM
Tamron SP AF 17-50mm f/2,8 XR Di-II LD Asph
Tamron SP AF 17-50mm f/2,8 XR Di-II LD IF
Tokina AT-X Pro 16-50mm f/2,8 DX
Tokina AT-X Pro 35/2,8 DX Macro
Nikon AF-S DX 18-55mm f/3,5-5,6 G VR II
Nikon AF-S DX 35mm f/1,8 G
Nikon AF 50mm f/1,4 D
Sigma 17-70mm f/2,8-4 DC HSM OS Macro
Sigma EX 17-50mm f/2,8 DC OS HSM
Sigma EX 24-70mm f/2,8 DG HSM

Macro lenses

Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2,8 Di Macro
Tokina AT-X M 100mm f/2,8 AF PRO D Macro
Nikon AF-S 60mm f/2,8 G ED Micro
Nikon AF-S DX 85mm f/3,5 G ED Micro VR
Sigma EX 70mm f/2,8 DG Macro
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2,8 Di Macro
Tokina AT-X Pro 35/2,8 DX Macro
Sigma EX 105mm f/2,8 DG Macro
Sigma EX 150mm f/2,8 DG OS HSM APO Macro
Sigma EX 50mm f/2,8 DG Macro

Super-zoom lenses

Sigma 28-300mm f/3,5-6,3 DG Macro
Tamron AF 18-270mm f/3,5-6,3 Di II VC LD IF Macro
Tamron AF 18-270mm f/3,5-6,3 Di II VC PZD
Nikon AF-S 28-300mm f/3,5-5,6 G ED VR
Nikon AF-S DX 18-200mm f/3,5-5,6 G IF-ED VR
Sigma 18-200mm f/3,5-6,3 II DC OS HSM
Sigma 18-250mm f/3,5-6,3 DC OS HSM
Tamron AF 28-300mm f/3,5-6,3 XR Di VC
Nikon AF-S DX 18-200mm f/3,5-5,6 G IF-ED VR II
Nikon AF-S DX 18-300mm f/3,5-5,6 G ED VR
Sigma 18-200mm f/3,5-6,3 DC
Sigma 18-200mm f/3,5-6,3 DC OS HSM

Tele-photo lenses

Nikon AF-S DX 55-200mm f/4-5,6 G ED VR
Nikon AF-S DX 55-300mm f/4,5-5,6 G ED VR
Nikon AF-S DX 85mm f/3,5 G ED Micro VR
Sigma 50-200mm f/4-5,6 DC OS HSM
Sigma 70-300mm f/4-5,6 DG APO Macro
Sigma 70-300mm f/4-5,6 DG OS
Sigma EX 105mm f/2,8 DG Macro
Sigma EX 150mm f/2,8 DG OS HSM APO Macro
Sigma EX 50-150mm f/2,8 DC APO HSM
Sigma EX 50-150mm f/2,8 II DC APO HSM
Sigma EX 50-500mm f/4-6,3 DG APO OS HSM
Sigma EX 70-200mm f/2,8 APO HSM DG Macro
Sigma EX 70-200mm f/2,8 II APO HSM DG Macro
Tamron AF 70-200/2,8 LD IF Di Macro
Tamron AF SP 70-300mm f/4-5,6 Di VC USD
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2,8 Di Macro
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2,8 Di Macro
Tokina AT-X M 100mm f/2,8 AF PRO D Macro
Nikon AF-S 85mm f/1,8 G
Nikon AF 80-400mm f/4,5-5,6 D VR
Nikon AF-S 70-300mm f/4,5-5,6 G IF-ED VR

Wide angle lenses

Tokina AT-X Pro 12-24mm f/4 AF DX
Tokina AT-X Pro 12-24mm f/4 DX II
Nikon AF 35mm f/2 D
Nikon AF DX 10,5mm f/2,8 G ED Fisheye
Sigma 18-35mm f/1,8 DC HSM Art
Sigma 8-16mm f/4,5-5,6 DC HSM
Tokina AT-X DX 10-17mm f/3,5-4,5 Fisheye
Tokina AT-X Pro 11-16mm f/2,8 DX
Sigma EX 10-20mm f/3,5 DC HSM
Sigma EX 10mm f/2,8 DC HSM Fisheye
Sigma EX 24mm f/1,8 DG ASP Macro
Sigma EX 28mm f/1,8 DG ASP Macro
Sigma EX 4,5mm f/2,8 DC HSM Fisheye
Sigma EX 8mm f/3,5 DG Fisheye
Tokina AT-X 16-28mm f/2,8 PRO FX
Nikon AF-S 28mm f/1,8 G
Nikon AF-S 35mm f/1,8 G ED
Nikon AF-S DX 10-24mm f/3,5-4,5 G IF-ED
Nikon AF-S DX 12-24mm f/4 G IF-ED

 

Is the Nikon D7000 a good camera for beginners?

The Nikon D7000 is a camera for intermediate-level photographers. It’s not an ideal camera for beginners. A lot of the features and functions of this camera aren’t really targeted towards new photographers.

The D7000 is also quite expensive for beginners. If you would like to see some more affordable cameras check out our Sony a5100 Vs Nikon D5500 comparison.

 

 

 

Conclusion

That brings us to the end of this guide. If you followed the steps above, you should have no trouble controlling this camera. If you arr unsure about anything please read the camera’s manual.

Hope you found this helpful. If you have any questions, feel free to comment below. Also make sure to check out our other guides and comparisons.